Freedom From Smoking

                           

    There are more than 50 million smokers in the United States. About 1 in 5 adults and teens, with more than 1,200 people dying daily from smoking-related diseases. This makes smoking the largest cause of morbidity and mortality in the country. Smoking cigarettes causes cancer, breathing disorders, heart attacks and stroke. It has been linked to reduced fertility, miscarriages, impotency, gum disease, cataracts, bone thinning, hip fractures and peptic ulcers. Cigarette smoking costs the economy over $198 billion in anual healthcare costs and lost productivity.

            Freedom from Smoking is an 8 session, 7 week program that introduces participants to key stages of behavior changes. In this program learn ways to cope with stress, how to keep from gaining weight, set goals to make it harder to pick the habbit back up, get support, track how many cigaretts you smoke a day, and how many days you have been tobacco free. Contact Mississippi County Health Department for further information.

Benefits of Quitting

20 Minutes After Quitting:

Your heart rate drops to a normal level.

12 Hours After Quitting

The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.

2 Weeks to 3 Months After Quitting:

Your risk of having a heart attack begins to drop.Your lung function begins to improve.

1 to 9 Months After Quitting:

Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.

1 Year After Quitting:

Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker's.

5 to 15 Years After Quitting:

Your risk of having a stroke is reduced to that of a nonsmoker's.Your risk of getting cancer of the mouth, throat, or esophagus is half that of a smoker's.

10 Years After Quitting:

Your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a smoker's.Your risk of getting bladder cancer is half that of a smoker's.Your risk of getting cervical cancer or cancer of the larynx, kidney or pancreas decreases.

15 Years After Quitting:

Your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as that of a nonsmoker.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.

 
Are you ready to quit? Click Here!
Mississippi County Indoor Air Quality Control Questionnaire
 

Mississippi County Health Department
info@misscohealth.com :: login :: email login

1200 East Marshall, Charleston, MO 63834 | 573.683.2191
202 E. Pine, East Prarie, MO 63845 | 573.649.5502
Charleston Hours:
Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
East Prairie Hours: Monday & Tuesday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
*See specific programs for extended hours